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New shop for trowbridge

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Debs:
⭐New Shop Opening Soon⭐     in trowbridge by the old post office

Baby clothing - Premature and upwards.

Traditional toys.

Personalised embroidered gifts.

 Handmade Pompom baby blankets

Opening day to be announced 🙂
For those who have fb here is the link for the page.
This is my daughters business. Its been mainly markets, pop up shops and fayres and online so far for the past 2 years.  She has rebranded and now going into premises.   Unique signs and graphics  ( based in trowbridge) have put in window coverings while its being worked on inside.   

https://www.facebook.com/TinyToesBabyBoutique2019/

I obviously wish her all the best in this next stage

baldy:
Good luck to your daughter.

As a Commercial Property GP Chartered Surveyor looking at the photo of the shop in your post, I immediately noticed the cracked mortar in the front block wall over the recessed window / entrance frontage.  This may be no big issue if the steel lintel or reinforced concrete beam inside the wall is OK and the blocks just need new mortar, but I would want to know exactly what caused this before entering into any legal contract that involves any responsibility for paying any maintenance or repairs for the shop building.

I would only trust a Chartered Building Surveyor to identify the correct cause of this type of structural problem as they understand the engineering works needed and the tests required to ensure all is well. Any other type of surveyor would be guessing to some extent about what's happening inside. A local Building Surveyor would then know which builders can do a decent job ...   A residential surveyor or GP or Valuation or Quantity Surveyor would not have the correct training to get to the exact diagnosis via the correct tests or inspections ...

I know that many small or one wo/man band or start-up businesses do not use professional advice from a surveyor when taking a business lease or licence to occupy small premises so if your daugher is entering any sort of arrangement that involves paying for external or structural repairs or maintenance, she needs to look at this point very carefully first. Better still she needs a non-repairing lease where the Landlord only is responsible or even better a simple licence to occupy that makes plain that all repairs are the landlord's responsibility.

A lot of new business folk with no real experience of business leases get caught out with long and complex business leases that say on one hand that the Landlord is responsible for external and structural repairs (possibly also saying that the tenant is responsible for the fascia and window) but buried deep in the lease are service charge provisions where the Landlord can recover all his expenses including all repairs and maintenance. 

This trap occurs all the time including when solictors are used by the tenant to sort the lease, especially when they are local solicitors working from small practices in small country towns.

I've seen this happen when the person I know says it's a non-repairing lease so no problem. Then sometime later I get to see the lease and realise that it's a long document for a standard commercial business lease that - as usual - puts a full repairing and insurance liability on the tenant via a comprehensive service charge recovery clause. In fact, when I've pointed it out some folk have actually gone into complete denial and blamed someone else who they claimed dealt with their solicitors and has lost their own correspondence file with the solicitors ... which then allows the solicitors for the tenant to say that they were never asked to ensure a non-repairing lease etc in the first place.

Bob DeBilda:

--- Quote from: baldy on January 13, 2020, 13:47:36 pm ---

As a Commercial Property GP Chartered Surveyor looking at the photo of the shop in your post, I immediately noticed the cracked mortar in the front block wall over the recessed window / entrance frontage. 


--- End quote ---

Not to mention the bullet holes  ;D

baldy:
I think some of the other marks on the upper blockwork such as the holes and horizontal dirty line look like they were probably caused by the installation of and then removal of an awning or simply a fascia panel (with the name of a previous business).

I don't think the awning or fascia/ name panel caused the blockwork to crack, though.

I think something has made the beam sag. 

If the wall faced south towards a hot sun, I might suspect the lack of an expansion joint has started the crack but I think this building faces north(ish).

Debs:
Thanks for your input , i shall show this to her partner

I do know landlord / owner is responsible for repairs

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